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July 08 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Downgrading Global Equities to Underweight

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from Morgan Stanley which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

The argument at this stage in the market cycle is less about valuation and more about the fear of missing out. If bond yields are compressing because of the anticipation of massive monetary easing that bond-equity spread will be a significant tailwind for equities on a breakout scenario.



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July 08 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Erdogan Draws the Line on Rates After Shock Central Bank Ouster

This article by Firat Kozok and Cagan Koc for Bloomberg may of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Hours after unexpectedly forcing out the central bank’s governor, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan made clear that he expects both the successor and the rest of the establishment to toe the government’s line on monetary policy.

The decision to dismiss Murat Cetinkaya, whose four-year term was due to end in 2020, was announced in the early hours on Saturday following a pause in interest rates that lasted for over nine months. Deputy Governor Murat Uysal was named as a replacement. Investors weren’t impressed -- the lira slid more than 3% in early Asian trading before paring losses.

During a closed meeting after the decree came out, Erdogan told lawmakers from his ruling party that politicians and bureaucrats all need to get behind his conviction that higher interest rates cause inflation, according to an official who was present. He also threatened consequences for anyone who defies the government’s economic policies, the official said.

Erdogan’s office of communication didn’t respond to calls and text messages seeking comment. “By abruptly dismissing Cetinkaya, Erdogan reminded everyone who is in charge of monetary policy,” said Piotr Matys, a London-based strategist at Rabobank.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Governance is everything and when you have an autocrat in power who is resorting to progressively more desperate measures to hold onto power there is a problem. Losing the re-run election for mayor of Istanbul, a couple of weeks ago, was a wake-up call for Erdogan. That’s a position he once held himself and retaining control of the largest city is essential if he wants to hold onto power. That is probably what precipitated the ouster of the central bank chief.



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July 08 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

New Democracy Meets Old Greek Problems After Mitsotakis Win

This article by Sotiris Nikas for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

“The weight of responsibility is heavy,” Mitsotakis said in his victory speech in Athens Sunday night. “I assume the burden with complete awareness of the situation the country is in.” Greece’s economy expanded 1.9% in 2018 and is on track for about 2% growth this year. Since Mitsotakis’s victory in the May 26 European Parliament elections, the Athens Stock Exchange general index has risen more than 20%, while yields on 10-year bonds have fallen to record lows. Greece is planning a new bond sale by the end of the month to capitalize on that momentum to secure sustainable access to financial markets that was lost in 2010

Eoin Treacy's view -

Greece has exited its assistance program and has benefitted from some debt forgiveness. The rationalisation of the economy remains underway and significant asset sales have occurred so the new administration does have some leeway in which to move. Perhaps the most important development is the replacement of a leftwing populist with the market friendly administration. That could be particularly beneficial in a recovery scenario.



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July 08 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

China Is Forcing Tourists to Install Text-Stealing Malware at its Border

This article from vice.com maybe of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Together with the Guardian and the New York Times, the reporting team commissioned several technical analyses of the app. Penetration testing firm Cure53 on behalf of the Open Technology Fund, researchers at Citizen Lab from the University of Toronto, and researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum as well as the Guardian itself all provided insights about BXAQ. The app's code also includes names such as "CellHunter" and "MobileHunter."

Once installed on an Android phone, by "side-loading" its installation and requesting certain permissions rather than downloading it from the Google Play Store, BXAQ collects all of the phone's calendar entries, phone contacts, call logs, and text messages and uploads them to a server, according to expert analysis. The malware also scans the phone to see which apps are installed, and extracts the subject’s usernames for some installed apps. (Update: after the publication of this piece, multiple antivirus firms updated their products to flag the app as malware).

Eoin Treacy's view -

Xinjiang is one of China’s buffer states which separates the heartland from its neighbours. It is also an energy producer and bread basket so China has additional reasons to quell even a whiff of separatist sentiment. The extend of surveillance and re-education programs (incarceration) is unparalleled in modern history and is a testament to just how overtly authoritarian the administration is.



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July 05 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

July 05 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Guide to the Markets Q3 2019

Thanks to a subscriber for this chartbook from JPMorgan which may be of interest to subscribers. Here is an important graphic.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

2018 saw significant multiple compression. The rebound in the first quarter unwound the entire decline but also unwound much of the multiple compression. Earnings guidance for the upcoming reporting season is a lot weaker than over the last few years and is the basis for the opinion that we are about to see an earnings recession.



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July 05 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Betting Against The Gods Is Now Impossible

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from GaveKal which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

 A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

Every mania has a contradiction at its centre. In the 1980s, it was the Imperial Palace in Tokyo really was worth more than the entire state of California. In the 1990s it was earnings don’t matter. In 2000s it was CDS could absolve everyone of default risk. In this decade it is that no one loses money from negative yields.



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July 05 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Iron Ore's "Disconnected From Fundamentals" After Huge Rally

This article by Krystal Chia for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section: 

Iron ore has skyrocketed this year, hitting the highest level in more than five years, after a dam disaster at Brazil’s Vale SA and bad weather in Australia curtailed shipments just as Chinese demand expanded. The steelmaking material made another dash higher in recent weeks after Australian miner Rio Tinto Group cut output guidance again following operational problems. The ascent has spurred concerns the advance may prove to be unsustainable.

“Supply is looking pretty decent, with the exception of Rio,” Hedborg said. Exports from Australia in June should be strong as some miners ramp up in the last month of their financial year, he said. In Brazil, Vale has also restarted its Brucutu mine, a major operation that was suspended after the dam
collapse.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The iron-ore price remains in a steep uptrend and exhibits an increasingly wide overextension relative to the trend mean. The first clear downward dynamic is likely to signal a peak of at least near-term significance and the beginning of a reversion towards the mean.



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July 04 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for July 4th 2019

July 04 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on our investment philosophy.

New subscriber here and enjoying the site/audio. Anything on the site or audio that explains your philosophy on markets and approach? I've purchased your book as well so maybe that is the simple answer!

Eoin Treacy's view -

Welcome to the Service and thank you for this email which others may also have an interest in. Crowd Money was my best attempt at creating a companion guide to The Chart Seminar back in 2013 and the principles of crowd psychology and trend consistency covered in it are the basis for the analysis performed in this Service.

FullerTreacyMoney is a top down macro behavioural global strategy service. The best place to be in any market is in a consistent trend. In order to find the most consistent trends we scour the world. Having an appreciation of what a consistent trend is, how they evolve and how they end allows us to form trend running strategies.

There are really only two big factors in the market; crowds of people and monetary policy. Central banks kill off bull markets so we need to pay attention to what they do. Likewise, when oil is surging or when banks can’t make money that impairs liquidity creation so we need to monitor those markets. Of course, the opposite is also true. Central banks help create the liquidity conditions for bull markets to prosper and falling energy prices improve industrial profitability. That also leads to an awareness of long-term cycles in the behaviour of crowds.

Liquidity is not enough. You also need a fundamental story or theme to animate investor interest over the span of secular bull markets. Big themes, supported by abundant liquidity are what drives long-term bull markets. That is why we focus on the rise of the global consumer, the accelerating pace of technological innovation and secular bear market in energy. 

The evolving path of extraordinary monetary policy, rise of populism and geopolitical rivalry can all be viewed in the historical framework of liquidity and crowd psychology.  



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July 04 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Swiss Standoff With EU Belies Country's Deep Economic Dependence

This article by Catherine Bosley for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

An EU attempt to compel Switzerland to agree to the treaty by denying the country’s bourse recognition under EU equivalence rules seems to have had little or no impact, with the benchmark SMI Index closing at a record high on Tuesday. There may be more salvos to come.

The EU could up the ante by refusing to revise an agreement on technical barriers to trade, which would hit several companies, notably in the medical-technology sector. There’s also Switzerland’s participation in EU research programs like Horizon 2020, which would thwart universities and research and development activity.

“They’re in a position where they’re highly dependent on the EU - just look at the map,” said Nicholas Veron a senior fellow at the consultancy Bruegel in Brussels.

Like Brexit
Switzerland’s issues with the EU are not that different from those of Brexit backers in the U.K. Many in Switzerland are upset about high levels of immigration and regard the 28-member bloc as a dysfunctional bureaucracy. Unlike the U.K., however, Switzerland was never part of the bloc, and instead has a special relationship based on 120 agreements, which the EU now wants to consolidate and streamline into one new treaty.

That’s proved to be a contentious undertaking. The EU made concessions on a dispute arbitration panel, but with labor unions up in arms about wages -- fearing they would face downward pressure in high-income Switzerland -- Bern wouldn’t sign on to the so-called framework deal. Certainly not ahead of a general election in October.

Eoin Treacy's view -

How much of the increasing acrimonious relationship between the EU and Switzerland is about the new treaty and how much is about the impending Swiss election and the desire to look strong and independent to a wavering population?



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July 04 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on Christine Lagarde

A fairly damning assessment of Ms Lagarde that does not bode well for the Eurozone.

Putting Christine Lagarde in charge of the ECB will lead the eurozone into catastrophe

 

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for this article which may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

A smooth functionary might be fine at the ECB in normal times. Over the next five years, however, the eurozone will certainly face another crisis. The German banking system is teetering on the edge of collapse (the once mighty Deutsche Bank’s share price remains the scariest chart in the world). Bond yields have turned negative, signalling recession. Interest rates are already below zero. A currency war is starting with Donald Trump’s America.

The ECB will have to find new ways of holding a rackety currency together. What is that likely to involve? Some form of helicopter money, as printing cash and giving it away is known, bailing out the German banks without anyone noticing, and allowing Italy to quietly float away with a parallel currency. Draghi’s flexibility and creativity might just have allowed him to navigate all that.

Lagarde will stick to precedent and orthodoxy with lawyerly inflexibility – and that will plunge the zone into a potentially terminal crisis.

The accusation that Christine Lagarde lacks the imagination to lead the ECB is potentially important, in extremis, but the reality is she does not need a great deal of imagination to print more money. That is the conclusion of the market.



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July 03 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

July 03 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on the gold/gold miners' ratio:

Thank you very much for your excellent analysis of the precious metals on Friday's video. If possible, can you please also comment on the gold/gdx ratio in one of your future videos and/or comment of the day. As always thanks very much for your excellent service.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for your kind words and I am delighted you enjoyed the Big Picture video. It’s been a big month for gold and gold shares but the relationship between the two deserves a special mention.

I prefer to look at the ratio the other way around and I use the Gold BUGS Index because it has a more back history.

Gold shares massively outperformed in the early part of the last bull market. They had a lot of leverage to the gold price because they had not been able to invest in new supply for years and were running very tight operations. The focus was on survival rather than expansion. As profits rose and confidence improved the majority of gold miners went on a spending spree in an effort to replace depleted reserves. That erased their free cash flow and loaded their balance sheets with debt. Gold miners’ performance relative to gold peaked in 2003 and investors moved on to ETFs and leveraged products.



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July 03 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

High Profits at Low Rates - The Benefits of Bond Convexity -

This article from portfoliocharts.com contains a number of highly informative graphics and may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

This chart is one of my favorites that I’ve made in a while, as not only does it contain a lot of interesting information but I also learned a lot by making it. Here are a few of the most important takeaways:

1. At high interest rates the coupon is most important, and at low rates capital appreciation is king

2. Short and intermediate term bonds (typically capped at about 10 years) are much less sensitive to interest rates at all levels than long term bonds

3. Low-interest 30-year bonds are very volatile! In fact, the range of returns is similar to what you might expect from the stock market.

4. Note that the spread of total returns for long term bonds is not symmetrical. Because they are increasingly more sensitive with every drop in rates, for the same +/-1% change they actually have more upside than downside.

5. One thing that’s not obvious from the chart is that interest rate sensitivity declines as bonds age. A new 30-year bond will start on the red line. When it only has 15 years left, it has the volatility of the green line. And when it only has 5 years left it has the predictable tight range of the purple line. Just like people, bonds get less active as they mature.

But if you take only one point away from this post let it be this:

Because of convexity, bonds have way more income potential at very low or even negative rates than most people realize.

Eoin Treacy's view -

This is one of the more explanatory and informative reports I have seen on the bond markets and helps to explain the continued momentum driven move despite the fact nominal yields are at objectively unattractive levels. However, it is also worth considering that the most compelling arguments for the success of a momentum strategy almost always appear during the acceleration phase of a bull market



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July 03 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

India's Water Crisis Is Man-Made

This article by Mihir Sharma for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Climate change activists have long argued that water will be the political flashpoint of the 21st century. Water-stressed India will likely be one of the first places to test that theory. The state of Tamil Nadu complains that it doesn’t receive its fair share of the waters of the Cauvery River; recently, the authority that nominally manages the river accused the government of neighboring Karnataka of holding onto water that it should have allowed to flow down to the Cauvery delta.


Things might get even testier up north, where more than a billion people depend upon rivers that rise in the Himalayas. Bangladesh and Pakistan feel that India is being stingy with river water.  Indian strategists constantly worry that China will divert water from the Himalayan rivers that rise in Tibet to feed the thirst cities in its own north.

The floods in Chennai are a warning. As the world warms, the rains on which India depends have become erratic: They frequently fail to arrive on time, and they fall in a more disparate and unpredictable pattern. The country can no longer afford to waste its dwindling resources.

A rapidly urbanizing and developing India needs to drought- proof its cities and rationalize its farming. Water-harvesting must be a priority, alongside mechanisms for groundwater replenishment. As it is, every summer is hotter and less bearable. If Indians run short of water as well, one of the world’s most populous nations could well become unlivable

Eoin Treacy's view -

India’s population is likely to exceed China’s sometime in the middle of the 2020s and peak around 1.6 billion sometime in the middle of the century. That’s a lot of people in a country that already seems crowded.

Generally speaking, water shortages are usually more about mismanagement of resources than an absolute lack of the precious commodity. There are exceptions of course but when rains fall every year the question is less about quantity and more about the quality of governance. In just the same way countries need clear national energy, commercial, military and political action plans, national water managements plans are also necessary for the long-term welfare of populations.



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July 02 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for July 2nd 2019

July 02 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Roubini Lives Up to Dr. Doom Alias With Global Recession Call

This article by Gregor Stuart Hunter for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

On the trade front, deglobalization looms as countries around the world have to choose which country to align with -- the U.S. or China -- once the bilateral negotiations collapse, Roubini said. “This divorce is going to get ugly compared to the divorce between the U.S. and the Soviet Union.”

On top of that, an oil-price shock coming from Iran tensions would raise the prospect of 1970s-style stagflation as a rise in crude prices coincides with slower growth, Roubini said.

Speaking at a blockchain summit in Taipei, Roubini reiterated his skepticism toward cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.

“There’s massive, massive amounts of price manipulation” in cryptocurrency trading, he said in remarks at the conference. As for blockchain, “it’s the most overhyped technology ever, it’s nothing better than a glorified spreadsheet,” Roubini said. “Nobody’s using it, and nobody’s ever going to use it.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

The stock market is at a new all-time high, but there is still such an impending sense of doom. That is not what one expects from market tops. Nouriel Roubini has a particular talent for soundbites, not least about cryptocurrencies. However, the challenges he alludes to are worthy of consideration.



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July 02 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Lagarde to Succeed Draghi as ECB Chief As Economy Weakens

This article by Simon Kennedy for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

In moving from Washington to Frankfurt, Lagarde will be tasked with driving monetary policy in a 19-nation economy which Draghi has already signaled will need more help, likely in the form of lower interest rates and possibly with the resumption of quantitative easing. Inflation is running at barely half the ECB’s goal of just under 2% despite years of negative rates and 2.6 trillion euros ($3 trillion) of bond purchases.

Investors will likely bet that as a seasoned crisis-fighter, Lagarde will share Draghi’s taste for aggressive and innovative monetary policy, especially as her appointment means the more hawkish Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann misses out.

Financial markets are already pricing an ECB rate cut by September, in line with predictions by ECB watchers at Bloomberg Economics and Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

Lagarde last week described the world economy as hitting a “rough patch” and advised central banks to continue to adjust their policies in response. In June 2014, she said she would “certainly hope” the ECB would conduct QE if inflation stayed sluggish -- months before it announced it would do so.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Christine Lagarde fits the bill of a credible dove. Her candidacy ensures the ECB is moving back toward quantitative easing and negative interest rates. That’s good news for the liquidity fuelled bull market.



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July 02 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Musings From The Oil Patch July 1st 2019

Thanks to a subscriber for this edition of Allen Brooks ever interesting report. Here is a section:

Growing gas production has also allowed buyers to worry less about having substantial volumes in storage to meet winter demand.  Therefore, buyers see little need to lift gas prices to encourage storage injections.  That dynamic has been demonstrated by the low level of storage we reached last year, and now how quickly we are rebuilding storage, while also meeting increased gas consumption from the power and export markets.  

The recent gas production growth, which accelerated starting in 2016, appears to be slowing.  To some degree, it is a function of the Permian Basin crude oil pipeline capacity shortage, which has restricted associated natural gas output.  Will that change when the new oil pipelines begin operating later this year?  Only time will tell, but official forecasts call for a slowdown in the growth of gas production.  That means the bigger question for the natural gas market will be demand.

A recent webinar on the natural gas market and outlook through 2020 had two charts we found very interesting.  The first dealt with the significantly different gas storage picture in Europe.  Today, storage is well ahead of last year, which may have an impact on the amount of future liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipments.  So far, it appears to have had little impact, but the lack of clarity about output levels from the Dutch gas fields could also impact the market for U.S. LNG shipments to Europe.  

The most interesting chart was explaining the firm’s gas price forecast compared to the NYMEX futures strip price.  The forecasters were able to frame their perspective about the upside and downside to their forecast by listing and quantifying the positive and negative factors for gas demand and supply.  We are not endorsing the forecast, but rather pointing out that there are a number of plusses and minuses that need to be considered when making a gas price forecast.  

Eoin Treacy's view -

Natural gas is in a secular bear market. There is no shortage of it and a steep contango remains evident. That continues to exert downward pressure on the price. New sources of outsized demand are required to resolve this condition. Outsized economic growth, hydrogen fuel cells or shifting demand from coal are all candidates.  The downtrend suggests these sources of potential demand are not yet strong enough to influence the market.



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July 02 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Why India's Troubled Shadow Banks Spook the Market

This article by Divya Patil for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

4. Is the crisis spreading?
Mortgage lender Dewan Housing Finance Corp Ltd. missed debt payments in June and Care Ratings Ltd. slashed its AAA credit rating to D this year. A news site alleged in January that the company diverted funds to shell companies, a claim Dewan Housing has denied. Other companies including Reliance Capital Ltd. and Piramal Capital & Housing Finance Ltd. have also had their credit ratings cut on liquidity concerns. Access to funding has gotten tougher for many non-bank financing lenders in credit markets, and they have a record 1.1 trillion rupees ($15.9 billion) of debt due in the third quarter of 2019.

5. Where is this heading?
The worst is probably still to come. Observers warn the credit crunch may hit the property sector next. It is heavily dependent on funds from shadow banks, and concerns are already being reflected in some realtor bonds. The nation’s conventional banks may also see more pain, as about 7% of their loans are extended to non-bank financing companies.

6. How are shadow lenders coping?
As access to funds in onshore debt markets has dwindled, shadow lenders are tapping overseas markets where they have to pay 25 to 50 basis points more than onshore rates to get cash.

7. What’s the economic impact?
India’s consumption engine is sputtering because the shadow-banking sector plays a key role in the nation’s financial system, particularly in delivering credit at the grassroots. A prolonged slowdown in lending from the sector poses a significant challenge to the Indian economy, where consumer spending growth has cooled on everything from toothpaste to air tickets. It expanded just 5.8% in the quarter ended March -- the slowest pace in five years and lagging behind China.

Eoin Treacy's view -

India’s shadow banks are experiencing a liquidity crisis which is throwing the wider market’s valuation premium into focus. We know how this process ends. First, a bad bank will need to be set up and filled with the nonperforming assets of the housing finance companies/shadow banks. If shadow banks are to be rationalised, the conventional banking sector will need to pick up the slack in terms of liquidity provision.  



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July 01 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for July 1st 2019

July 01 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

BIS Says It's Time to Fire Up All Engines to Boost World Growth

This article by Catherine Bosley and Anna Andrianova for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The Switzerland-based BIS, which promotes cooperation among the world’s monetary officials, used its annual economic report to urge politicians to “ignite all engines” to overcome a global soft patch. They should make structural reforms and strengthen fiscal and macroprudential measures, instead of relying on ever-lower interest rates in a debt-fueled growth model that risks turbulence ahead.

“The continuation of easy monetary conditions can support the economy, but make normalization more difficult, in particular through the impact on debt and the financial system,” the BIS said. “The narrow normalization path has become narrower.”

U.S.-led protectionism has dented economic confidence and slowed growth, forcing central banks to prepare to ease policy again even if they haven’t yet returned to their pre-crisis settings. The Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank are expected to cut interest rates this year, while nations including Australia, Russia, India and Chile have already started.

Economists at Citigroup Inc. estimate that while fiscal policy in the major industrial countries will be expansionary this year it will be less so in 2020 as past measures in the U.S. wear off.

Eoin Treacy's view -

There is a confluence of factors that are leading to support for Modern Monetary Theory. On the one hand we have central banks stating that the fuel from monetary accommodation is not as effective any longer. They are telling governments to engage in fiscal stimulus and decluttering of the regulatory environment to boost growth. Governments for their part are saying to central banks that they will pursue massive deficit spending if interest rates don’t shoot up immediately afterwards.



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July 01 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Bitcoin Tumbles as Cryptocurrency's 2019 Surge Starts to Waver

This article by Adam Haigh and Vildana Hajric for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Bitcoin slumped, undoing some of this year’s epic rally and amplifying a recent trend of outsized weekend moves.

The largest cryptocurrency fell more than 18% from Friday to trade at $10,294 as of 11:58 a.m. in New York, according to prices compiled by Bloomberg. It’s still up almost 200% since the start of the year. Most other large coins also dropped, with Bitcoin Cash and Dash declining at least 7.6%. Litecoin erased an earlier gain.

Optimism surrounding a potential increase in adoption of cryptocurrencies helped fuel price increases on Bitcoin last month. That took prices back to levels last seen at the start of 2018. The slide over the weekend is at odds with recent moves higher on Saturday and Sunday: surges in weekend activity since the start of May accounted for about 40% of Bitcoin’s price gains this year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Raising the possibility that central banks may feel the need to create tokens, Bank for International Settlements General Manager Agustin Carstens said in an interview with the Financial Times that it may be “sooner than we think that there is a market and we have to create our own digital currencies.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

Bitcoin was originally designed as a response to the debauchment of fiat currencies in response to the credit crisis. By creating a digital asset with limited supply, it aims to hold value in a manner fiat currencies can’t. This limited supply feature is a significant factor in its value proposition but it is incompatible with the wider aim of delivering an alternative financial system.



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July 01 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Gold Sinks Most in a Year as Trade Truce Deals Blow to the Bulls

This article by Ranjeetha Pakiam and Elena Mazneva for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section: 

Gold tumbled back below $1,400 an ounce after the U.S. and China reached a truce in their trade war, dealing a blow to havens.

Prices fell the most in a year after Donald Trump and Xi Jinping agreed to resume negotiations in a bid to resolve differences between the world’s top-two economies. Still, the setback may be temporary as investors now train their focus on U.S. jobs data due Friday for clues on the Federal Reserve’s next move on policy.

“Gold was well overdue a period of consolidation and gold bulls should welcome it,” said Ross Norman, chief executive officer of gold brokerage Sharps Pixley Ltd. “This provides a welcome entry point.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

“Don’t pay up for commodities” is about the most useful adage we came to live by in the commodity bull run of the early 2000s. Commodities are volatile but even that provides a consistency characteristic that is useful for traders. Breakouts are seldom sustained.



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June 28 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 28 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Platinum Giants Resist Pay Demands After Hitting Price Jackpot

This article by Felix Njini for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

“These kind of wage demands will keep investors away,” said Ross Harvey, an independent economist. “The costs of doing business in South Africa remain too high, and the policy environment too risky, to warrant large sunk-cost investments.”

While its sister metals have surged, the price of platinum is trading near a decade low, leaving producers claiming they have little cushion to invest. Lonmin rebounded to profit in the six months through March, but only after four years of losses.

“These demands mean that there will be no money to reinvest, which is necessary for a sustainable industry,” said Wellsted.

Still, there are some causes for investor optimism. AMCU’s Mathunjwa has so far dispensed with most of his usual fiery rhetoric in favor of a more conciliatory tone. Moreover, three years ago, the union accepted a 12.5% wage increase for the lowest-paid workers after initially demanding 47%.

Much will depend on whether platinum miners toughen their stance in a bid to limit any wage deal to a single-digit increase, said Ben Davis, a mining analyst at Liberum Capital.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Mining is, perhaps, the best paid job people with less than a tertiary education can have. It obviously comes with drawbacks, not least an increased risk of death. As a result, mining unions have tended to me more militant than most and the pay demands they come up with bear little resemblance to what is considered normal in other industries.

The issue with granting demands for higher pay are multi-faceted, but the two most important are the precedent it sets and what can be requested in return for more money. Mine efficiency, implementation of labour-saving devices and automation are generally not supported by unions because of the effect that would have on the number of people employed. However, if South Africa is to have any hope of revitalising its industry these kinds of work-practice reforms have to implemented.



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June 28 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Elliott's $34 Billion Roundup Fix Is No Magic Pill

This article by Chris Hughes for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Fighting to settle, rather than win, would be the best approach. Bayer has argued Roundup is safe when correctly used, but it has lost three consecutive cases. Its expert evidence has been weighed by juries and has failed to convince them.

A new legal team could try to put different arguments and experts in front of jurors. But consider, too, the heavy punitive damages being awarded – $2 billion in the last case. These are likely to reflect jurors’ dim view of Monsanto's corporate conduct as concerns about the weedkiller’s safety emerged. This issue will recur in every future case.

Appealing would cost Bayer time. By the same token, a settlement would deliver a certain and faster resolution for the thousands of plaintiffs. The individual circumstances of each case make it hard to gather them together into a swiftly-resolved class action.

The snag is that even a fair settlement would not mean a return to business as usual. The best financial scenario for the company would be a deal that is affordable, with farmers continuing to use glyphosate and Roundup staying on sale, perhaps with modified instructions about how consumers should use it appropriately. This is not assured.

Moreover, Bayer will still merit a management discount for all that has happened, and a conglomerate discount given its unproven strategy of combining pharmaceuticals and crop science. CEO Werner Baumann misjudged the risks of buying Monsanto, a deal that brought Roundup with it; he has taken too long to revise his litigation strategy. He could yet turn the situation around by resolving the lawsuits and extracting synergies from the acquisition. Until he does, the jury is out both on his future and a break-up.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Bayer made a mistake in taking on Monsanto’s Roundup liability. However, it also underestimated the animus directed at the company for its work practices over years of rising seed prices, cases against farmers and the anti-GMO movement. Anything that can arrest the risk of both more negative headlines will be a positive, not least because the market has already priced in a disaster.



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June 28 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Banks Soar as Fed Paves Way for Better-Than-Expected Payouts

This article by Felice Maranz for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here it is in full:

The biggest U.S. banks, including Bank of America Corp., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., rallied to the highest in more than a month on Friday, after the Federal Reserve cleared them to boost payouts.

“Ask and ye shall receive” was the common theme with the results of this year’s Capital Analysis and Review, known as CCAR, Evercore ISI’s Glenn Schorr wrote in a note. Most of the banks he covers beat Evercore ISI’s, and consensus, expectations for total dollars of capital return, and all the banks beat in terms of payout ratios.

The “enormous” capital plans announced by JPMorgan, BofA, Citigroup Inc. and Wells Fargo & Co., amounting to a combined total of over $130 billion, show that “the industry is extremely well capitalized,” RBC’s Gerard Cassidy wrote in a note.

Even so, Morgan Stanley’s Betsy Graseck cautioned that the party won’t last. This year’s results were “the last hurrah,” she wrote in a note, with payouts probably declining 21% in 2020, as “capital is now close to optimized.” Her advice? “Enjoy it while you can.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

- Higher dividends are what investors have been waiting for in the banking sector so this is good news. The biggest question raises in the last paragraph above it where the revenue growth is going to come from to sustain payouts?



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June 27 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 27 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

For China, Kicking a $9 Trillion Habit Is Tough

This article by Anjani Trivedi for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

For now, Beijing doesn’t appear to have many options: The fact that activity is picking up even as officials attempt to calm nerves in the interbank funding market shows the economy’s deeply rooted, steadfast reliance on these institutions for credit, especially when banks are flinching.

For years, trust companies worked alongside China’s banks to keep credit flowing in the system. The headline drop in their assets under management has largely come from a decline in trust beneficiary rights products. These are loans put in a trust special-purpose vehicle, which effectively allows banks to reclassify souring debts. Trust companies have also acted as agents between companies lending to each other. Together, so-called entrusted loans and trust loans stood at 20.1 trillion yuan at the end of the first quarter.

Most of trust-backed products are concentrated at regional lenders – the likes of Baoshang Bank Co., which was recently taken over by regulators. In the early part of 2017, such products, in the form of investment receivables, increased between 10% and 40% at smaller banks. At Baoshang, they rose close to 15% and stood at 153 billion yuan, or a quarter of its assets, according to its latest financials.

Eoin Treacy's view -

When I was the Bloomberg account manager for DWS in Luxembourg back in the early 2000s one of the primary roles the team had was to create special purpose vehicles for loans of dubious quality that management of Deutsche Bank wanted to keep off book. We all know how that turned out and the bank is still reeling from its experiment with balance sheet leverage.



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June 27 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Ship Owners Need to Step Up Demolition Activity For a Sustainable Market Rebound

This article from Hellenic Shipping News may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

n a separate note this week, GMS, the world’s leading cash buyer said that “the stagnating inertia in the international ship recycling markets continued this week, with Pakistan, Bangladesh and Turkey entirely offline due to Eid holidays (winding down the Holy Month of Ramadan) and the traditionally quieter monsoon season gradually getting under way in the Indian sub-continent. There was a brief bounce in the Indian market following the election victory of the pro-business Mr. Modi, but local steel prices have begun to cool off ever since and Alang Buyers appear notably reluctant to commit on new vessels as most of the market focus is now shifting to Alang, due to the overall intransigence from Pakistan and Bangladesh and the higher offers emanating from India. The market in Bangladesh remains the quietest of all, with the upcoming budget on June 13th likely to determine the immediate direction on prices, which have already lost USD 20 – USD 30/LDT over the last few weeks. Most yards in Chattogram also remain stuffed with tonnage and demand is at the lowest it has been all year, with essentially no new enquiries emanating from local Buyers. The expectation (as seems to be the case year-after-year) is that new duties / taxes are set to be announced in this budget and prices are likely to decline further thereafter. As such, Bangladeshi Buyers are no longer keen to import fresh tonnage before the date of the budget, given the likelihood of increasing duties within the next week”, GMS concluded.

Eoin Treacy's view -

I had hoped to create a composite chart of the volumes of vessel demolitions in places like India, Turkey, Bangladesh and China. Although Bloomberg has indices for all these metrics, none of them appear to have any data so that is not going to be possible. The reason I wanted to view some clear data on vessel demolitions is because it would give us some intelligence into how clear a signal the rally in the Baltic Dry Index is providing for the health of the global economy.



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June 27 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Morningstar Downgrades H2O Allegro

This article may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

 

The fund was placed under review on June 19 after Dobrescu flagged up concerns over a conflict of interest. H2O’s chief executive Bruno Crastes was named as a board member of Tennor, a holding company run by Lars Windhorst. Shares in Paris-listed Natixis - H2O's parent company - slumped after the fund was placed under review. Following Morningstar’s announcement, Natixis said Crastes had resigned from Tennor, saying the risk of a possible conflict of interest was "groundless".

Morningstar's Dobrescu said the H2O Allegro fund, which has seen millions of euros of outflows this month, needs to regain investors’ trust. The fund, which takes long positions on the U.S. dollar and eurozone debt, has produced stellar annualised returns of 16.5% over the past eight years but this has been achieved at a “higher risk than investors could have expected”.

The majority of the illiquid bonds that analysts had concerns over have now been sold off or marked down. The exposure to these bonds has been cut from 10% of the portfolio to 3.8% as of June 24.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The siren call of stellar returns from illiquid assets has claimed more than a few funds lately. This practice represents a special type of hubris; that assets under management will never be called back.



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June 27 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on Chart Library bugs with a Mac

FTM charts regularly fail to populate when first opening on an Apple device (mine anyway), but if you change the time line the chart will immediately populate.

So, if you open a chart and it's on 5 years but does not populate, change it to 1 year or whatever you want and all will be well from then on for that chart.

Obviously, if it happens on the next chart you open, repeat the process. 

Bit of a faff but once you know how it works it quickly becomes automatic and seamless.

Very much enjoying your balanced wide ranging and often very illuminating commentaries.

Good man,

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thanks for your kind words and for alerting me to this bug. Last night was the first time I have ever used a Mac so I found it surprising that charts were having difficulty loading. I have forwarded on this issue to our IT chaps who will be taking a look at it.



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June 26 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 26th 2019

June 26 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Google's Quantum Processor May Achieve Quantum Supremacy in Months

Thanks to a subscriber for this article from Interesting Engineering. Here is a section:

After the list goes above 6, the numbers start becoming so large and abstracted you lose the sense of the gulf between where Google is and where it will be at the next step.

In the case of Moore's Law, it started out in the 1970s as doubling every year, before being revised up to about every two years. According to Neven, Google is exponentially increasing the power of its processors on a monthly to semi-monthly basis. If December 2018 is the 1 on this list, when Neven first began his calculations, then we are already between 5 and 7.

In December 2019, only six months from now, the power of Google's quantum computing processor might be anywhere from 24096 times to 28192 times as powerful as it was at the start of the year. According to Neven's telling, by February--only three months after they began their tests, so 3 on our list--, there were no longer any classical computers in the building that could recreate the results of Google's quantum computer's calculations, which a laptop had been doing just two months earlier.

Neven said that as a result, Google is preparing to reach quantum supremacy--the point where quantum computers start to outperform supercomputers simulating quantum algorithms--in a only a matter of months, not years: “We often say we think we will achieve it in 2019. The writing is on the wall.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

Double exponential growth takes the doubling we have been accustomed to and turns it into powers. Therefore, instead of 2, 4, 8, 16 improvements we get 4, 16, 256, 65,536. With that kind of growth rate, the pace of innovation becomes so rapid that new chips become instantly obsolete. It makes a nonsense of ever owning a quantum computer and means provision of cloud services will likely be the primary way in which this kind of computing power is accessed. IBM has already been trialling that kind of access with its Watson artificial intelligence and nascent quantum service.



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June 26 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Putin's Big Bet on Gold Is Paying Off Nicely

This article by Leonid Bershidsky for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The U.S. dollar’s dominance as a global reserve currency is commonly thought to result from the dearth of safe assets. Russia, however, recently has provided an example of how a sizable economy with the world’s fifth biggest international reserves can minimize dollar assets ad still do well. So far, it doesn’t have many followers, but gold buying by central banks is going up.

Since being hit by sanctions for its aggression against Ukraine in 2014, Russia has had good reasons to rethink the composition of its international reserve. While the European Union hasn’t toughened its sanctions for almost five years, the U.S. has been doing it all the time. The Kremlin and the Bank of Russia consider the risk of further restrictions unpredictable and dependent more on U.S. domestic politics than on anything Russia does. In the 12 months since the end of September 2017, the central bank has more than halved the dollar’s share in its international assets and sharply increased the shares of the euro and the renminbi.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Net central bank accumulation of gold is as much about sourcing a hedge against geopolitical trouble as it is a response to the clear threat to the Dollar from the adoption of Modern Monetary Theory by the US government.

Central banks buying dipped in 2017 but started to trend higher in 2018 and hit new decade highs this year. That represents a potent source of demand which is helping to support prices.



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June 26 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

So Close Yet So Far Apart: Inside the Italy-EU Budget Tussle

This article by Marco Bertacche and Lorenzo Totaro may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

For 2019, the EU could grant Italy flexibility available for unexpected events like last summer’s bridge collapse in Genoa. That would bring the adjustment required down to 0.42% of GDP.

Italy meanwhile says that a series of one-time revenues plus lower-than-expected spending for the populists’ flagship programs are worth about 5.3 billion euros. That’s enough to improve the structural deficit by 0.1 percentage point, the Treasury says -- the commission is forecasting a deterioration of 0.2 points.

If Italy’s numbers are right, then the two sides are just 0.3% of GDP or about 5 billion euros apart. That in itself might be close enough for the commission to give Rome a pass again.

But that may be overshadowed by the prospect of another battle when discussions on the 2020 budget start in September.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Fiscal austerity is the price the Eurozone’s creditors demanded for extraordinary monetary policy. However, it presupposes that the near 20-year process of debt to GDP alignment it represents, will be swallowed by populations faced with a generation of declining living standards and subpar growth. The rise of populism is a message people are unwilling to take that kind of hit to their personal wellbeing particularly when it falls disproportionately on the most heavily indebted and in need of support.



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June 25 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 25 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Fed Lowers Long-Run U.S. Rate Outlook as Growth Outlook Dims

This article by Steve Matthews for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

“This is really important,” said Torsten Slok, chief economist at Deutsche Bank Securities, who expects a rate cut in July. “For many years, the Fed has been arguing that monetary policy was easy and accommodative and supporting growth and inflation. After a decade of easy monetary policy, the Fed has decided that policy is no longer stimulative.”

Reasons listed for the lower neutral rate include ongoing fallout from the financial crisis, weaker productivity, continued slackness in the labor market and an aging population, which when combined leave the economy structurally weaker and so more vulnerable to rate hikes.

The upshot is the Fed may have to lower rates if it wants to boost expansion to offset global headwinds, including slow global growth and trade disruptions from President Donald Trump’s tariff battles.

Powell will give his view of policy in a speech on Tuesday to the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The trend of the Fed Funds Rate is downwards. There is a clear succession of lower major rally highs since the early 1980s and the failure of the Treasury yield to hold the move above 3% late last year suggests another lower high is now in place. If we accept the conclusion the peak of the interest cycle has now passed the next big question is just how low can rates go?



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June 25 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Swiss Spat With EU Prompts London Curbs on Country's Shares

This article by Alexander Weber, Silla Brush and Viren Vaghela for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The political agreement at the heart of the issue -- which seeks to replace treaties on everything from agriculture to immigration and civil aviation -- was finalized in November last year. It hasn’t been endorsed by the Swiss government because it’s unpopular at home, in part because of fears it’ll erode high local wages.

Earlier this month, while saying it was still “broadly positive,” Switzerland asked for some clarifications.” That was seen in Brussels as an attempt by the country to renegotiate the accord, which the EU has ruled out.

The commission has also complained about “foot-dragging” by the government in Bern, and unless the commission decides otherwise, regulatory equivalence of the Swiss stock exchange will expire at the end of the week.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The UK is not the only country which has had difficulty getting a deal negotiated with the EU approved at home. The interesting point about this process, from an outsider’s perspective, is the similarity in the EU’s response to both Switzerland and the UK. The refusal to reopen negotiations, the threat of disavowing regulatory equivalence and imposition of deadlines are being used as tactics in both sets of negotiations.



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June 25 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

A Dark Alley in China's Credit Market Suddenly Getting Rough

This article from Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

For firms that obtained funding via unorthodox methods, conditions may become particularly challenging. One of those practices is known as structured issuance, where a company will transfer cash to an asset manager to buy a slice of the bonds the company is itself selling. The manoeuvre helps give the appearance of greater demand for its securities and stronger ability to obtain funding. What could make the practice untenable is if asset managers can no longer use those securities held in custody as collateral for repos.

“Since some repo transactions have defaulted recently, it is unclear whether companies can continue to borrow money from the structured issuance method, said Meng Xiangjuan, chief fixed-income analyst at SWS Research Co. in Shanghai. “If it stops, some issuers will certainly face difficulties operating their business normally, and their debt-repayment pressure will rise,” she said.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The main headline today was the fact some Chinese banks have been breaking the sanction prohibitions on North Korea. However, the fact it is possible for companies to partially fund their own bond issuance by promising to buy it themselves with the funds received is garnering a lot less interest.



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June 24 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 24 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Don't tell me WHAT to buy, tell me WHEN to buy

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from Jeffrey Saut. Here is a section:

Well, as stated on June 3rd, we said a bottom was formed with the SPX at ~2729 and that the SPX was going to trade to new all-time highs.  Three sessions later, with the SPX at 2852, we wrote the stock market was probably going to stall into mid/late-June, but that new all-time highs were still coming.  The stock market did indeed stall, but only for about 5 sessions followed by a breakout to new all-time highs.  Indeed, “Don’t tell me what to buy, tell me when to buy!”

Meanwhile, some Wall Street pundits suggest the SPX has already tagged their year end price target, stocks are expensive, and a recession is on the horizon.  They obviously are NOT listening to the message of the market that is predicting no recession.  Speaking to their other points, while earnings estimates for the S&P 500 have come down from roughly $173 to $168 for 2019, and $188 for 2020, stocks are not all that expensive on forward earnings.  If those estimates are correct, it implies the SPX is trading at 17.5x this year’s estimate, which granted is a tad on the expensive side, but only at 15.7x earnings for next year.  However, our models tell us under the current interest rate environment the right price earnings multiple (PE) should be 19.  Therefore, 19x this year’s estimate yields a price target of 3192 for the SPX.  If 2020’s estimate is anywhere near the mark, the SPX’s price target becomes 3572 (19 X $188 = 3572).  To wit, the average PE multiple at the end of just about every bull market is 18.89x earnings (Chart 1).  As a sidebar, the SPX’s PE ratio at the end of the late-1990’s bull market was over 30.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

I was in UPS on Saturday returning something to Amazon and I asked the guys working in the store how business was. They said it was busier than normal for the time of year. That’s what I see in Mrs. Treacy Amazon business too. If that’s the case where is the evidence of the recession?



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June 24 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

The Future of Hydrogen

This report from EIA may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section

The time is right to tap into hydrogen’s potential to play a key role in a clean, secure and affordable energy future. At the request of the government of Japan under its G20 presidency, the International Energy Agency (IEA) has produced this landmark report to analyse the current state of play for hydrogen and to offer guidance on its future development. The report finds that clean hydrogen is currently enjoying unprecedented political and business momentum, with the number of policies and projects around the world expanding rapidly. It concludes that now is the time to scale up technologies and bring down costs to allow hydrogen to become widely used. The pragmatic and actionable recommendations to governments and industry that are provided will make it possible to take full advantage of this increasing momentum.

Hydrogen can help tackle various critical energy challenges. It offers ways to decarbonise a range of sectors – including long-haul transport, chemicals, and iron and steel – where it is proving difficult to meaningfully reduce emissions. It can also help improve air quality and strengthen energy security. Despite very ambitious international climate goals, global energy-related CO2 emissions reached an all-time high in 2018. Outdoor air pollution also remains a pressing problem, with around 3 million people dying prematurely each year.

Hydrogen is versatile. Technologies already available today enable hydrogen to produce, store, move and use energy in different ways. A wide variety of fuels are able to produce hydrogen, including renewables, nuclear, natural gas, coal and oil. It can be transported as a gas by pipelines or in liquid form by ships, much like liquefied natural gas (LNG). It can be transformed into electricity and methane to power homes and feed industry, and into fuels for cars, trucks, ships and planes.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

The dramatic decline in natural gas prices and the abundant quantities being produced and in reserve mean that it is inevitable that new sources of demand will appear to take advantage. Since natural gas is one of the primary sources of hydrogen, it makes sense to promote fuel cell vehicles or range extenders for electric vehicles. How long it will take for this evolution to have an effect on the market is questionable, but it will probably be the catalytic event necessary to boost prices out of the long-term base. 



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June 24 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Bitcoin Surpasses $11,000 as Memories of Popped Bubble Fade

This article by Eric Lam, Vildana Hajric and Joanna Ossinger for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Bitcoin traded above $11,000 for the first time in 15 months, recouping more than half of the parabolic

increase that captured the attention of mainstream investors before the cryptocurrency bubble burst last year.

“The bounce-back of Bitcoin has been fairly extraordinary,” said George McDonaugh, chief executive and co-founder of London-based blockchain and cryptocurrency investment firm KR1 Plc. “Money didn’t leave the asset behind, it just sat on the sidelines waiting to get back in.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

When I got on the plane yesterday Bitcoin was trading at around $10,000. When I landed in London it was at $11,000. That’s a big move even for bitcoin. So, what’s going on?



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June 21 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 21 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Stocks Whipsawed as Quadruple Witching Spurs Bursts of Volume

This article by Lu Wang for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

One scenario on how Friday’s event may have boosted share prices was laid out by Charlie McElligott, a cross-asset strategist at Nomura. In a note earlier this week, he attributed buying to traders who sold bullish options on the S&P 500 at strike prices of 2,950.

The muddling effect from quadruple witching may not be over this week, according to McElligott. As the market loses the buying “impulse” from options traders, stocks may fall next week, prompting a narrative that investors are starting to doubt the Fed and setting the stage for the S&P 500 to rally to 3,000, he said.

“The market then risks ‘mis-reads’ this potential flow-centric weakness in equities next week as some sort of ‘fading the Fed’—when in fact it’s almost entirely mechanical in nature,” McElligott wrote. “This type of head-fake could in fact see more shorts added and sentiment purge, which then perversely is the fodder for a melt-up.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

Quadruple witching is usually a storm in a teacup and seldom corresponds with major tops or bottoms. The one thing we do know is when a market makes a new high after a period of ranging, the headline level puts shorts on notice. 



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June 21 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Maldives Holidays and SUVs Are Badges of Shame Now: Chris Bryant

This article by Chris Bryant for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The windshields of large cars parked in my Berlin neighborhood were plastered this week with angry
messages on lurid orange stickers. The owners were told that: “Driving an SUV causes serious climate damage,” “SUVs harm your unborn child,” and “Driving an SUV causes impotence.” That last one may have been a joke.

Sports utility vehicles have long been hated by the more civic-minded among us. They tend to consume more fuel, spew out more pollution and take up more parking space. It’s been suggested that their size and weight are also partly to blame for the rising number of pedestrian road deaths.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Angela Merkel has been Germany’s Chancellor for longer than anyone before her and her chosen successor has been deemed no longer fit for purpose. That leaves the competition to replace her wide open and it is increasingly likely that the next government will be heavily dominated by the Green Party. This will represent the latest iteration of the populist wave which in this case will see leftwing populists gain sway over a major economy.



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June 21 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Solar Cycle Science

The subject of solar minimums is starting to arise once more in popular media and this site, from a former NASA scientist, contains all of the relevant information. Here is a section:

In the 1800s astronomers realized that the appearance of sunspots was cyclic, with a period averaging about 11 years. As new features of the Sun (solar flares, filaments, prominences, coronal loops and coronal mass ejections) were discovered, it was found that they too varied along with the frequency of sunspots. The sunspot number is now commonly accepted as a measure of solar activity. Solar activity itself has been linked to satellite failures, electrical power outages, and variations in Earth’s climate. The impact of solar activity on Earth and our technology has created a need for a better understanding of, and the ability to predict, solar activity.

Sunspot activity over the last four hundred years has shown that the amplitude of the sunspot cycle varies from one cycle to the next. The average cycle has a peak sunspot number of about 150. At times, as in the period known as the Maunder Minimum between 1645 and 1715, solar activity can become so weak that it seems to disappear for several decades at a time.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The Maunder Minimum persisted for about 50 years between 1650 and 1700 but rigorous recording of sunspot activity did not really start until 1750. I see a lot of misreporting of data by lobby groups arguing both for and against anthropomorphic climate change with each bending the data to fit their own narrative. I did some cycle analysis of solar cycles a decade ago predicted the lower high of the current cycle so I thought would refresh that now.



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June 20 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 20th 2019

June 20 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Gold Achieves Liftoff as Prices Rocket Toward $1,400 an Ounce

This article by Elena Mazneva and Ranjeetha Pakiam for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Investors are pouring money into gold-backed ETFs again, following four months of outflows. Holdings tracked by Bloomberg have already seen the biggest monthly increase since January.

Bullion producers are also catching an uplift. The $10 billion VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF, which tracks shares of gold mining companies, jumped to the highest in more than a year on Thursday. And a separate gauge of senior gold producers including Yamana Gold Inc. and Barrick Gold Corp. rallied to the highest since November 2016.

Central Bank Buying
In another bullish signal for gold, central banks are continuing to buy the metal as countries diversify their assets away from the U.S. dollar. China increased its reserves for a sixth straight month in May.

Other countries have also been buying -- first-quarter purchases were the highest in six years, with Russia and China the largest buyers, according to the World Gold Council.
 

Eoin Treacy's view -

The money flowing into gold ETFs is positive but it is nothing compared to the volume that flowed into the asset class during the gold bull market. What is positive, however, is the trend has continued higher since the initial surge in 2016 which suggests net investor demand has remained in place despite the range which has persisted for the last few years.



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June 20 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Currency war is the next phase of global conflict and Europe, the chief parasite, is defenceless

This article by Ambrose Evans Pritchard for the Telegraph may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:
 

The deflationary cancer is now so deeply lodged in the eurozone that it would take helicopter money or People's QE -- monetary financing of public works -- to fight off any future global slump. Such action would violate the Lisbon Treaty and would test to destruction Germany's political acquiescence in the euro project.

In truth QE in Europe has always worked chiefly through devaluation. The euro's trade-weighted index fell 14 percent a year after Mr. Draghi first signalled in 2014 that bond purchases were coming. That was powerful stimulus. When the euro climbed back up the eurozone economy stalled.

It takes permanent suppression of the exchange rate to keep euroland going. As the Japanese have discovered, it is very hard for an economy with near zero inflation and a structural trade surplus to stop its exchange rate from rising unless it resorts to overt currency warfare. That is exactly what Mr. Trump is not going to allow.

Every avenue of monetary stimulus is cut off in the eurozone. Only fiscal stimulus a l'outrance -- 2 or 3 percent of GDP -- will be enough to weather a serious crisis. That too is blocked.

“The ECB has masked the fragility over the last seven years and nobody knows when the hour of truth will come,” said Jean Pisani-Ferry, economic adviser to France's Emmanuel Macron and a fellow at the Bruegel think tank.

“There is no common deposit scheme for banks. Cross-border investments are retreating. The vicious circle between banks and states could come return any moment,” he said.

Mario Draghi's rhetorical coup in July 2012 worked only because he secured a partial approval from Germany for the ECB to act as lender-of-last resort for Italy's debt (under strict conditions). That immediately halted an artificial crisis. The situation today is entirely different. The threat is a deflationary slump. The ECB has no answer to this.

Markets thought they heard a replay of "whatever it takes" in Mr. Draghi's speech and hit the buy button. But economists heard another note in Sintra: a plaintive appeal for EMU fiscal union before it is too late.

The exhausted monetary warrior was telling us that the ECB cannot alone save the European project a second time.

Eoin Treacy's view -

It is arguable how much the USA needs an interest rate cut with full employment, compressed bond yields and a consumer which is in rude health. Low yields are spurring a mortgage refinancing binge and the decline in oil prices is also putting money in people’s pockets.



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June 20 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Thucydides Trap and gold

This article from aheadoftheherd.com may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

His main focus is to outline where the US and China are with respect to realpolitik, or practical considerations, and how to avoid war. The signs are not good.

Writing in The Atlantic, Allison states that “Based on the current trajectory, war between the United States and China in the decades ahead is not just possible, but much more likely than recognized at the moment.” That was written in 2015, before the trade war started, so the case for war is even stronger now.

According to Allison, events that could make two nations fall into the trap may be small, “business as usual” conflicts that, if they occurred in a different dynamic, would lead to nothing. For example, the assassination of archduke Ferdinand, a relatively obscure and minor figure, was the spark that lit a whole conflagration of events that plunged Germany, an ascendant maritime power, into war with Britain, whose Royal Navy ruled the seas for decades. Consider the current conflicts between the Chinese and US navies in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait. It would not take much - say a collision between two warships - to ignite the powder keg of war.

However, for the threat to be taken seriously, the rising power must have the capability to take on the incumbent power. Henry Kissinger, the US former secretary of state, wrote that “once Germany achieved naval supremacy … this in itself - regardless of German intentions - would be an objective threat to Britain, and incompatible with the existence of the British Empire.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

Technological innovation is a doubled edged sword. It opens up new markets and provides greater efficiencies. It helps to boost economic growth but it also displaces military technology and upsets the status quo. That allows new entrants a chance to gain comparative advantage.



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June 19 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 19th 2019

June 19 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Fed Scraps `Patient' Rate Approach in Prelude to Potential Cut

This article by Craig Torres for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

While inflation near the goal and a strong labor market are the most likely outcomes, “uncertainties about this outlook have increased,’’ the Federal Open Market Committee said in the statement following a two-day meeting in Washington. “In light of these uncertainties and muted inflation pressures, the Committee will closely monitor the implications of incoming information for the economic outlook and will act as appropriate to sustain the expansion.”

The FOMC vote was not unanimous, with St. Louis Fed President James Bullard dissenting in favor of a quarter-point rate cut. His vote marked the first dissent of Powell’s tenure as chairman.

Policy makers were starkly divided on the path for policy. Eight of 17 pencilled in a reduction by the end of the year as another eight saw no change and one forecast a hike, according to updated quarterly forecasts.

In the statement, officials downgraded their assessment of economic activity to a “moderate” rate from “solid” at their last gathering.

The pivot toward easier monetary policy shows the Fed swinging closer to the view of most investors that President Donald Trump’s trade war is slowing the economy’s momentum and that rates are too restrictive given sluggish inflation.

Eoin Treacy's view -

This statement tees up a rate cut in July. That is what the bond market has been pricing in and it got confirmation of that assumption today. Investor focus will now turn to the expectation that another cut will follow in September.



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June 19 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Musings from the Oil Patch June 18th 2019

Thanks to a subscriber for this edition of Allen Brooks’ ever interesting report for PPHB. Here Is a section on the commodity/S&P500 ratio:

When we contemplate the market’s assessment of commodities versus stocks, we find the former, which includes oil and gas, to be at the lowest valuation point in at least 50 years.  Does this mean that the commodity market it being disrupted?  Peak valuation points occurred in 1973-74, 1990 and 2008.  Each peak was associated with spikes in oil prices caused by geopolitical events such as the Arab Oil Embargo, the First Gulf War and the Global Financial Crisis, which happened as oil prices traded in excess of $100 per barrel.  Likewise, each low has been associated with low oil prices – either absolute lows, or lows below more recent oil price ranges.  

With respect to the low points in the valuation of commodities versus stocks, the prior two lows were marked by excess stock market speculation about super-growth stock future earnings.  The 1998-99  Dot.com Bubble, which saw companies brought public with barely any revenues and no earnings, but lots of “eyeballs” on web sites or clicks on shopping sites, happened to also be associated with oil prices falling to $11 per barrel as the Asian currency crisis unfolded and a brief global recession occurred.  The 1970-73 low was marked by the market bubble created by the Nifty-Fifty growth stocks, as price-to-earnings ratios for these 50 super-growth companies soared to ratios in excess of 50 times next year estimates for earnings per share.  Of course, two energy service companies – Schlumberger Ltd. (SLB-NYSE) and Halliburton Companies, Inc. (HAL-NYSE) – were part of this Nifty-Fifty stock group.  Crude oil prices at that point were in the $3 per barrel range, and there was a battle brewing between the seven largest global oil companies that ruled the international oil business and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries over the value of a barrel of oil for tax and royalty calculations.  That tax battle lit the fuse that exploded after the Yom Kippur War involving Israel and Egypt in 1973, leading to the Arab Oil Embargo and the explosion in global oil prices.  

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

This ratio has been doing the rounds of pundit commentary for the last couple of years because commodities are trading at a such a record low level relative to stocks. Jeff Gundlach in particular has been predicting a resurgence in commodity prices because of their relative discount to stocks and one of the reasons private equity has been so interested in the energy space is because of the relative discount to equities on offer, coupled with the prolific production profiles (and early payback) of unconventional wells.



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June 19 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on gold in other currencies and stock market/commodity ratios:

I am enjoying the commentary as usual. 

I had two questions for which I would be grateful for your opinion:

I don't understand why gold should be priced differently in different currencies. One would have thought that the market would arbitrage out the differences. 

The second one is more general and applies to looking at long term trends such as that for oil versus the stock market. Could it not be argued that technology changes such as the advent of green energy or electric cars or indeed new modes of producing oil (fracking, oil sands etc) render these charts ineffective as predictors of future price action?

I thank you and look forward to hearing from you in due course. 

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for these questions which I’m sure will be of interest to other subscribers. Gold is a commodity and subject to supply and demand fundamentals just like everything else but it is also a monetary metal. That means it tends to trade more like a currency than a commodity.



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June 19 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

U.K. Inflation Returns to BOE Target on Air Fares, Car Prices

This article by Jill Ward and Andrew Atkinson for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The figures come a day before the BOE’s latest policy decision. As many central banks around the world shift into a more dovish mode, U.K. officials have been trying to push in the other direction, repeating a message that interest rates may have to rise more than the market currently anticipates if there’s a smooth Brexit.

Investors haven’t taken much heed given the continuing uncertainty over Britain’s exit from the European Union. Certainly in the short term, the latest inflation figures give policy makers breathing space to wait and keep interest rates on hold.

The BOE expects inflation to fall back below target this year. In May, it forecast that price growth would average 2.1% this quarter, easing to about 1.6% by late 2019.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The Bank of England is protective of its independence, especially amid the continued contentious discussion about the merits or otherwise of Brexit. Nevertheless, with central banks all over the world signalling a willingness to cut rates, it seems foolhardy of the Bank of England to continue to signal its willingness to raise rates.



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June 18 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 18 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

ECB Rate Cut Is Weapon of Choice as Draghi Threatens Action

This article by Paul Gordon and Piotr Skolimowski for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

ECB President Mario Draghi appeared to set a low bar for action on Tuesday when he said additional stimulus will be needed “in the absence of any improvement” to the outlook for growth and inflation. He specifically cited rate reductions as an option, sending the euro lower and prompting money markets to price in a 10 basis-point cut by December.

Investors subsequently brought forward their expectations to September after Bloomberg’s report. Commerzbank now predicts such a policy step in July.

“Draghi is going to finish his tenure with a cut,” said Claus Vistesen, chief euro-zone economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. “The door is now open and I don’t see how they can not walk through it.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

There is a first principles question that governments have no appetite to grasp. “How do you recover from a debt bust?” We know what the answers are. You default, recapitalise and try not to make the same mistake again. The problem in Europe is the creditors are Northern European pension funds and the debtors were peripheral banks, who have had much of their debt absorbed by their respective governments. The prospect of debt forgiveness, therefore, has massive issues of moral hazard and was untenable politically, even though it remains necessary if the debt mountains are to be dealt with and growth prospects renewed.



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June 18 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Are Valuations Irrelevant?

This presentation by Rob Arnott for Research Affiliates may be of interest to subscribers.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the slides is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

This is a robust defense of Shiller P/E which, at 30, is at it second highest peak in history; surmounted only by the Tech Bubble. Let’s for a moment consider that it would be unwise to expect the best performers of the last decade to be the best performers of the next decade. After all, it only makes sense when we consider the base effect. It is obviously more difficult to double from a market cap of $1 trillion than from $1 billion.



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June 18 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Visa, Mastercard, PayPal Join Facebook to Form Crypto Effort

This article by Julie Verhage, Jenny Surane and Kurt Wagner for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The currency, called Libra, will launch as soon as next year. It’s what’s known as a stablecoin, one that can avoid massive fluctuations in value so it can be used for everyday transactions. Industry experts and insiders say the payments companies want a seat at the table to help shape the new currency.

“It’s not unusual for the incumbents -- Visa, Mastercard, PayPal -- to partner with a disruptor,” Harshita Rawat, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, said in an interview. “They would at least want to participate in how this product is being developed.”

New payment methods such as Apple Pay and other mobile wallets are often slow to take off, so any competition is likely to be years away. Still, the earlier payments companies come to the project, the more time they have to ensure their businesses don’t suffer.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A stablecoin is specifically designed to hold parity with a base fiat currency and therefore is not suited to speculative investment. They do, however, have attractions as being easy to convert into other crypto assets and have the same portability features. The one challenge stablecoins have had is there have a couple of instances of them being used as Ponzi schemes, because the provider did not have the assets on deposit to support the currency’s value. Facebook will likely solve for that problem at least, considering its substantial cash pile, but the much bigger issue will be in how it can monetise the financial transactions of its billions of users. That is where the clear investment opportunity resides.



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June 18 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

The Man Who Inherited Australia's Downturn Just Isn't That Fazed

This article by Michael Heath for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

That’s all put the economy on track for its weakest fiscal year since the last recession in 1991. Even the Reserve Bank, which rarely wades into political territory, is urging more government stimulus after cutting interest rates for the first time in almost three years.

But whether boxed in by his sunny disposition or pledges to deliver a budget surplus made ahead of the government’s shock re-election last month, Frydenberg appears unfazed. While he’ll push to pass tax cuts when parliament resumes on July 2 and ramp up infrastructure spending, that’s about it, leaving the heavy lifting of stimulus to the central bank.

“I’ve found the treasurer to be remarkably sanguine,” said Danielle Wood, an economist at the Grattan Institute, an independent think tank in Melbourne. “When you’ve got the central bank governor coming out and talking about perhaps moving to stimulatory fiscal policy as well as the need for more long-term structural reforms, I’d be hoping for a more substantive response.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

The RBA cutting interest rates to previously unimagined levels, with more to come, is a bonus for consumers with floating rate mortgages, but the wider concern is about the health of the Chinese economy which Australia depends on for export demand growth.



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June 17 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 17 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Internet Trends 2019

This report from Mary Meeker at Bond includes a large number of graphics which may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section from the introduction:

The rapid rise of gathered / analyzed digital data is often core to the holistic success of the fastest growing & most successful companies of our time around the world. Context-rich data can help businesses provide consumers with increasingly personalized products & services that can often be obtained at lower prices & delivered more efficiently. This, in turn, can drive higher customer satisfaction. Better data-driven tools can improve the ability for consumers to communicate directly & indirectly with businesses & regulators.

Core constituents (consumers / businesses / regulators) are increasingly drinking from a data firehose & management challenges continue to rise for all parties. Broad awareness of challenges (& related vigorous / heated debates) can be the first step in driving change.

Consumers are aware of concerns about Internet usage overload & are taking steps to reduce usage – leading USA-based Internet platforms have rolled out tools to help monitor usage & social media usage growth appears to be decelerating following a period of strong growth. Privacy & problematic content concerns are also top-of-mind & are following similar patterns.

Owing to social media amplification, reveals / actions / reactions about events can occur quickly – resulting in both good & bad outcomes. In markets where online real-time rating systems exist, accountability can be improved vs. offline options as consumers & businesses interact directly while regulators can also benefit.

Rapidly expanding connectivity has helped amplify voices of good & bad actors. This has brought new focus to an age-old challenge for regulators around the world – finding the most effective ways to amplify good & minimize bad, often resulting in different regional interpretations & strategies.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

The march of technology and pace of innovation as massive data sets are parsed, managed and exploited has helped to drive the bull market in data centres and the resulting cloud-based product offerings. That remains a powerful trend because new business models are springing up to lever the potential for costumer engagement from automating the product offering to cater to user demand. That represents a reversal of the traditional product to customer model and is a primary trend behind the creation of new companies.



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June 17 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

The Power of Self-Learning Systems

This presentation by Demis Hassabis from DeepMind may be of interest to subscribers. I found it fascinating.

June 17 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead

This article by Tom Polansek for Reuters may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Nationwide, farmers are expected to harvest the smallest corn crop in four years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The agency last week reduced its planting estimate by 3.2% from May and its yield estimate by 5.7%.

Farmers think more cuts are likely as the late-planted crop could face damage from hot summer weather and an autumn frost.

“An early frost will turn this world upside down,” Rock Katschnig, a farmer from Prophetstown, Illinois, said at the party.

Eoin Treacy's view -

It is one thing to have worries about being able to sell into overseas markets like China, it is quite another challenge not to have inventory at all. The failure to plant spring crops represents a significant risk for farmers if they plant late because of getting the wrong weather at the wrong time and potentially delaying winter crops.



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June 17 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Facebook's Answer to Bitcoin Is a Double Threat

This article by Lionel Laurent for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Weekend media leaks suggest that Facebook’s “Libra” project will be a continuation of its past efforts to expand its payments business and keep customers within the walled garden of its social media apps by creating their very own money.

While Zuckerberg is poised to unveil a team of partners – reportedly including eBay Inc., Farfetch Ltd., Spotify Technology SA, Uber Technologies Inc. and Vodafone Group Plc – so far this feels very much like Facebook’s baby. Tellingly, it’s not one that the big banks or the other Silicon Valley and Seattle giants seem ready to adopt quite yet, unless Zuckerberg surprises us with some bigger names at the launch.

The target customer base for these new digital tokens looks certain to be the 2.6 billion-strong user base of Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram.

While Facebook will no doubt assure us that this project is all about making the lives of its customers ever easier, giving them the ability to actually buy stuff in a way that Bitcoin has rarely offered, it’s hard to square it away with the political effort to curb Big Tech’s monopolistic tendencies (regardless of that roster of launch partners and their $10 million participation fees). 
 

Eoin Treacy's view -

If we were to summarise Facebook’s foray into cryptocurrencies it would be to say that Zuckerberg wants what Jack Ma and Pony Ma have. Alibaba has Ali-Pay and Tencent has WeChat-Pay. Respectively these represent the crown jewels of their respective business empires, because the payments platforms tie users to the parent app but also enable a significant multiplier effect by linking buyers with sellers.  

 



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June 14 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 14 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

YouTube University

Thanks to a subscriber for these notes from Jeff Gundlach’s conference call on Thursday. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

This idea that President Trump has a plan to make sure the economy is humming in the run-up to the Presidential Election is gaining ground on Wall Street and elsewhere. David Rosenberg put out a tweet last week expressing the same sentiment. 

Maybe Trump is a genius, after all. What if he finally gets the steep Fed rate cuts he has been demanding? After that, he ends the trade wars, tariffs go to zero, and the stock market surges to new highs -- just in time for the 2020 election!

I agree it is certainly possible he is self-absorbed enough to try and attempt to shape the economy’s prospects to his own interests but there is an alternative interpretation which does not get a lot of airplay.



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June 14 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Disruptive Innovation: WHY NOW?

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from ARK Invest which may be of interest. Here is a section

Eoin Treacy's view -

Secular bull markets are most often driven by massive technological innovation which creates productivity and growth and efficiencies where none where possible previously. That was true of mechanisation, electricity, semiconductors and the internet. It is also likely to be true of biotechnology, blockchain, artificial intelligence, robotics and batteries.



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June 14 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

This Time It's Different

Thanks to a subscriber for this note from Howard Marks, for Oaktree which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full note is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

The biggest manias tend to have the biggest internal contradictions which everyone is conditioned to accept while the bubble is inflating but can identify as ridiculous after it pops. That is one of the most important tenets of crowd psychology to remember during the Third Psychological Perception Stage of a bull market; where bubble risk is most acute.



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June 13 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 13th 2019

June 13 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day - on the USA's oil advantage:

Quick thought, following your comment on America's oil glut, and Morgan Stanley's report you highlighted.

I have been watching the difference in price between the WTI and Brent Crude for a long time now. The difference seems to vary between 10 and almost 20% depending on the day, with WTI obviously being the cheaper. Is it too SIMPLISTIC to say?

1) that US factories, offices, homes etc enjoy an enormous advantage over their global competitors with energy costs being so much cheaper, not forgetting it already enjoys a significant tax advantage over many as well.

2) when the US does become a significant oil exporter, it can make a lot of profit, even by offering only minor discounts to the Brent price to attract business. Possibly more profit than from its LNG exports.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for highlighting these points. I’ve always been a fan of Ockham’s Razor. There is no need to get over complicated. The USA has a massive advantage in terms of its oil and gas production capacity. That is reshaping global geopolitics, it will have a meaningful effect on the balance of payments and it has already had a meaningful effect on the chemical industry because of reduced input costs.  one.



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June 13 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Beyond Meat Gains as Tim Hortons Adds Sandwiches at 4,000 Shops

This article by Yue qi Yang for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

 

Beyond Meat Inc. got a reprieve from two downgrades in as many days after Tim Hortons said it’s now offering faux-meat breakfast sandwiches at almost 4,000 locations across Canada.

The plant-based meat products maker gained as much as 7.1% in early trading after the coffee-and-doughnuts chain said it added three breakfast sandwiches to the menu made with Beyond Meat sausages after testing them at select stores last month.

The stock reversed earlier losses driven by Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.’s decision Wednesday to cut its rating on Beyond Meat to market perform from outperform, saying shares of the company have gotten too expensive after a more than 400% rally since its May 1 initial public offering. On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s similar move spurred a 25% decline, Beyond Meat’s worst day since the debut.

Last week, the company reported quarterly earnings for the first time since the IPO, fuelling optimism among investors when it said sales would exceed $210 million this year, topping analysts’ estimates. It also said earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization would break even, compared with projections it would have a loss. The results reinforce that consumer demand for alternative meat products is on the rise.

Eoin Treacy's view -

After seeing such an impressive move on the upside since the IPO, when I saw a Beyond Meat Burger on the menu of my club’s restaurant this afternoon, I thought I had better taste one. It was good and certainly competes favourably with the de rigeur beef patties at most fast food outlets. I would hasten to add however that it pales in comparison with the gourmet burgers on offer in London and much of Europe. The cost on the other hand was on par with any average burger and that is an important part of its appeal.



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June 13 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Uranium Sector

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from Eight Capital which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Enviro Minister Schulze recently said that Germany will stick to its timetable to close the last nuclear reactor by YE22.  Some critics like Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess believe that it should wind down coal before nuclear. A recent Forbes article “What Does It Actually Cost to Charge Up an Electric Car focused on cost of charging an EV.  We took it one step further and also determined the environmental impact of Germany’s decision.  Given that France’s electricity generation is 73% nuclear and Germany is only 12%, we compared estimated costs and emissions associated with charging a Tesla Model S with a 100-kWh battery. First off, electricity prices appear 45% lower in France.  Secondly, CO2 emissions from electricity generation to charge an EV in France is just 13% of what it is in Germany. Yes, Germans would see a 140% CO2 reduction by using EV’s versus that from an average ICE vehicle, but the French would see a 1,720% CO2 reduction.

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

For the green movement there is no greater cause celebre than to combat nuclear proliferation. That consideration more than any other fired the resolve of Angele Merkel to wind down Germany’s nuclear industry following the Fukushima disaster even though Germany is not a seismically active area.



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June 13 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

What Your Face May Tell Lenders About Whether You're Creditworthy

This article by Zhou Wei for the Wall Street Journal may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

In its lending business, meanwhile, Ping An says it uses its technology to analyze the faces of loan applicants in real time, searching for “micro-expressions” that reveal their emotional and psychological state. Such expressions typically occur within fractions of seconds and are hard for people to control, and loan officers make more accurate judgments on the applicants’ credibility based on this information, according to an article posted by Ping An on its official WeChat social-media account in China last year.

For large loans, applicants often have to answer questions in an online video meeting that typically lasts 10 to 15 minutes. Ping An records and analyzes how the applicant answers questions, and looks for signs of eye-shifting or other suspicious behavior, which would be flagged by its system.

Ping An in January said it has made more than 500 billion yuan worth of loans with the help of its micro-expression technology. It also said the technology has helped shorten its average loan-approval times to two hours from five days.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Tracking movement of large numbers of people and compiling databases on patterns of behaviour, social media activity and even utilities bills is about as a Big Brother as is currently imaginable. The rolling out of the social credit scheme to the insurance sector is just another part of that long-term project to compile a unique score for each individual which will be more exact than a credit score and will have broad spectrum uses beyond credit, not least in quelling political activism.



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June 12 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 12 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

US Policy Mix Flips and Will Take the Dollar with It

This article by Marc Chandler for Bannockburn Global Forex may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

The policy mix of tighter monetary policy and looser fiscal policy provides a steroid-like boost to currencies.   This is what the US had under Reagan-Volcker.  It is was the policy mix in Germany after the Berlin Wall fell that led to the ERM crisis of the early 1990s and then Maastricht Treaty and the euro.  It helped fuel the dollar's gains last year.  Now that policy mix is reversing.  Fiscal policy is tightening, and monetary policy is poised to loosen.  That policy mix is associated with under-performing currencies.  

The third significant dollar rally since the end of Bretton Woods is in jeopardy.  Coordinated intervention marked the end of both the Reagan-Volcker and Clinton-Rubin dollar rallies.  Intervention in the foreign exchange market won't be necessary; the self-proclaimed "Tariff Man" has found another way the proverbial cat can be skinned.  

The last phase of a significant dollar rally has been marked by the movement of interest rate differentials against the US.  This been happening.   The two-year differential between the US and Germany peaked last November a little above 355 bp, which appears to be a modern extreme. It finished last week below 250 bp, the lowest in more than a year.   Similarly, the US two-year premium peaked against the UK around the same time a little shy of 220 bp.  It is now approaching 125 bp.   Against Japan, last November, the US two-year premium of nearly 310 bp was the largest in 11 years.  It is threatening to break below 200 bp.  

Eoin Treacy's view -

Quantitative tightening has been the single most important factor in the Dollar’s strength over the last 18 months. Reducing the size of the Fed’s balance sheet has contracted the supply of Dollars and created a supply inelasticity-based argument to support the currency.



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June 12 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Transcript of Felix Zulauf's interview by Grant Williams -

Thanks to a subscriber for this summary of the discussion at the recent Mauldin conference which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

The response of the stock market last week to the whiff of easing rhetoric from the Federal Reserve suggests investors are still willing to give the benefit of the doubt to the positive effect loose monetary and potentially fiscal policy can have on asset prices and by extension the economy.



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June 12 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

What if the US and China Reach a Trade Deal?

Thanks to subscriber for this report from Morgan Stanley which may be of interest. Here is a section:

June 12 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

How to Keep Thieves From Stealing Your PIN at the ATM

This article from the Wall Street Journal may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section: 

What’s more, no-name ATMs are often free-standing and not built into the wall, like those at banks. That means they’re easier to get inside of and thus more susceptible to skimming and other crimes, says Brian Krebs, who covers computer security and cyber crime at krebsonsecurity.com. (In fact, if you can see the top of an ATM, that’s a big warning sign, he says.)

That said, third-party ATMs are hardly the only machines to look out for. Says Mr. Rosenberg: “I’m pretty sure every type of ATM has had skimmers on them.”

Eoin Treacy's view -

There is no justifiable reason to use a debit card. They offer unparalleled access to one’s bank account with no protection and therefore the risk is simply too great relative to the benefit. Credit cards are insured, often have no fees tor holding the card and can be paid off automatically at the end of the month, plus they help to build credit. At least if your credit card is stolen you have recourse to the card issuer for recompense. That is a lot more difficult to with debit cards.



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June 11 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 11th 2019

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to today's video commentary is posted in the Subscriber's Area.

Some of the topics covered include: China moves to ease lending standards, supports the stock market and the currency, Wall Street pauses. gold, copper, lumber and corn steady, oil weak. Europe, India and ASEAN steady. Dollar steady but susceptible to additional weakness. 

Some of the topics covered include: China moves to ease lending standards, supports the stock market and the currency, Wall Street pauses. gold, copper, lumber and corn steady, oil weak. Europe, India and ASEAN steady. Dollar steady but susceptible to additional weakness. 

 



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June 11 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

On Target June 11th 2019

Thanks to Martin Spring for this edition of his ever-interesting report. Here is a section on China’s tech ambitions:

The FT reports that the US ban on infotech trade with China could be a problem for Google as its Android system is “central to the smartphone market in China, which is bigger than Europe and the US combined, due to its use by Huawei and other [Chinese] phonemakers include Oppo and Xiaomi.”

Chinese president Xi Jinping has spoken openly about his plans for China to gain global dominance in future high technologies in just SIX years’ time. Their foundation will be China’s capacity to design and manufacture cutting-edge semiconductor chips. $150 billion is being poured into achieving that. However, so far subsidies and tax breaks have only lifted China’s self-reliance in low-value chips.

The Americans are clearly using the current “trade war” to hinder Xi’s ambitious plans by demanding that the Chinese cease their theft of intellectual property, and of using their negotiating power to force technology transfers as part of the price of allowing joint ventures to operate in their huge domestic market. 20 per cent of European companies doing business in China, for example, say they are compelled to hand over technology to Chinese partners.

It’s unlikely the Americans will succeed in getting the Chinese to play fair. Agreeing to trade-balancing deals would be one thing. Agreeing to stop their massive co-ordinated attack on the heights of leading-edge industries would be something else. It’s certain they’ll renege on any promises about that they have to give.

Ironically, cutting Chinese access to American components and technology, or merely threatening to do so, is the strongest incentive of all to stimulate Chinese development of high-tech sectors.

Investors have generally taken the view that the ugly contest between Trump and Xi will be resolved in a “deal” that the American president can claim to be a victory, but Xi can present as a fair agreement. That still seems to be the likely outcome.

As for the arms race… that still has much further to run. It will be a key part of the long-term strategic contest between the hegemon and its fast-growing global challenger.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The challenge in competing with the West is less in developing hardware, which can be copied at will, but in developing the software to function across platforms, communicate between devices and provide both back and front-end support. It is no mistake that the majority of the companies which have attained mega-cap status are software driven and outsource manufacturing of their hardware. There is no doubt China is capable of creating its own software systems, but it is not an easy process and will take time even with an army of programmers.



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June 11 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

China Sets Yuan Fixing Stronger Than Expected in Sign of Defense

This article by Tian Chen and Ran Li for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

"Forget about the psychological 7 level," said Khoon Goh, head of research at Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd., adding that the fixing will stay stronger than 6.9 before the Group of 20 summit. "Today’s fixing sends a clear message that the authorities are still intent on keeping the yuan stable, and
have no desire to see it weaken further."

Trump Says He’ll Raise China Tariffs If Xi Won’t Meet at G-20 U.S. President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping may meet at the G-20 summit in Osaka this month. Traders will be closely watching the gathering to gauge the outlook for trade negotiations and the yuan.

"We expect the Chinese authorities to continue defend 7 in the foreseeable future," said Becky Liu, head of China macro strategy at Standard Chartered Plc, adding that a negative outcome at the G-20 summit wouldn’t warrant a change in this stance. "The PBOC may step up the size and frequency of bill issuance should the yuan come under greater depreciation pressures."

Eoin Treacy's view -

With upwards of a million people protesting on the streets of Hong Kong and the world paying attention to the trade war between the USA and China, the Chinese administration has a clear incentive to project an aura of stability and calm.



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June 11 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

BOE Hike Warnings Go Unheeded as Rate Cuts Seen as More Likely

This article by David Goodman for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section

Bank of England policy makers and investors are taking contrasting views of the U.K. economy as official warnings of potential interest rate hikes clash with market predictions for a cut.

The market moves are partly based on a belief that the U.S. Federal Reserve is on course to reverse its recent hiking path, forcing central banks around the world to follow suit, but also reflect the drastically different Brexit outcome built into investors’ outlook.

While the BOE’s forecasts -- including its hawkish view of longer-term inflation -- are based on the assumption of a smooth Brexit process, investors have the luxury of being more nimble, and so have increasingly priced in the risk of a no-deal departure in October. That’s not without reason, since no deal is a policy advanced by a number of potential candidates to replace Theresa May as prime minister this summer. There are also nascent signs that BOE officials are ending their year of unanimity, with some edging closer to the market’s view.

Eoin Treacy's view -

The UK is just about the only developed market where inflation measures are above the comfort level of the central bank and yet the Bank of England is not in a position to raise rates. CPI has been above 2% since early 2017 and while the rate moderated from 3% to 2% last year it has stabilised this year. Brexit represents a key uncertainty because a hard exit would deliver a short sharp shock which would justify the low interest rate environment, whereas if the UK ultimately decides to remain in the EU, the Pound is undervalued and the Bank of England be more inclined to raise rates.



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June 10 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Video commentary for June 10th 2019

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to today's video commentary is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

Some of the topics covered include: Wall Street extends rally but fails to hold intraday high, Treasuries susceptible to some consolidation, Gold and precious metals pause, oil weak, Dollar eases, Rand and Peso steady, Renminbi breaks downwards from its short-term range, 



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June 10 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on South African governance:

In your recent big picture video, you outlined the possible trajectory of some of the emerging market currencies in a declining dollar environment. Some time ago I emailed in to state my reasons why I thought the ZAR might be one of the worst in the immediate future. Events since the recent election have only served to confirm that view. At the moment there is a struggle going on in the ANC regarding the mandate of the Central Bank The powerful ANC secretary general wants the mandate changed from the focus on inflation to include growth and jobs considerations. In a public statement this week, Mr Ace Magashule wants the bank to embark on a policy of "Quantity Easing" whatever that might mean!! This would inevitably send South Africa in the direction of Zimbabwe. This country could end up worse than Zim for the following reason.

Recently, there have been a series of xenophobic attacks involving firebombing of trucks on some of the main motorways. Local companies have been employing drivers from Zimbabwe who are intelligent and highly motivated at the expense of local South Africans. The history of primary and secondary education could not be more different in these adjacent countries. Even under Mugabe the colonial legacy of education was left in charge of the churches who maintained a strong culture of teaching and learning rooted in Christian values. Zimbabwe still uses the Cambridge University exams for both "O" and "A" levels set in 1954. In South Africa, the Apartheid government passed the Bantu education act into law which took away the control of the churches and gave it to the state. This has proved to be an unmitigated disaster by any measure. The last thing South Africa needs right now is a huge population of poorly educated young people currently around 30% many of whom embrace a culture of entitlement

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for this on-the-ground perspective of the environment in South Africa. The dumbing down of curricula is a global phenomenon linked to the cutting of educational funding, the expanding power of teacher’s unions, the lack of commitment from parents to take responsibility for the education of their own children and the desire of politicians to show results against a background of deteriorating fundamentals. It’s a secular trend and shows little sign of changing because it would require everyone to work harder for a distant benefit which seems to be beyond the ability of society to collectively deal with right now.



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June 10 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Sunset of China's REE Dominance

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from Hallgarten & Co which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

China has overplayed its hand in the rare earth metals sector. Two years ago, it produced 80% of the worlds supply, now it produces 70%. The global economy is now alert to the fact that these metals represent vital components in all manner of new technology products.



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June 10 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day - on silver miners:

With the silver/gold ratio at multi-year lows, coupled with the adage that silver is high beta gold, I’ve been evaluating from a contrarian perspective whether to increase my exposure to silver whilst the market is in the depths of despair and await a possible turnaround. 

The problem is where to venture as the fundamentals of virtually every silver producer are pretty scary, including CDE, which has been mentioned from time to time in your Comment of the Day.

I came across this informative article which analyses in some detail the current state of the market and its various producers, the declining percentage of their production which is silver related, and their prospects of outperformance should the silver price recover. 

I would appreciate your insight into this analysis and which companies, or ETF’s, you feel might be worth considering for investment.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Thank you for this informative article which may be of interest to other subscribers. Here is a section:

Silver mining is as capital-intensive as gold mining, requiring similar large expenses to plan, permit, and construct new mines, mills, and expansions. It needs similar fleets of heavy excavators and haul trucks to dig and move the silver-bearing ore. Similar levels of employees are necessary to run silver mines. But silver generates much-lower cash flows than gold due its lower price. Silver miners have been forced to adapt.

This is readily evident in the top SIL miners’ production in Q1’19. SIL’s largest component in mid-May as this latest earnings season ended was the Russian-founded but UK-listed Polymetal. Its silver production fell 15.0% YoY in Q1, but its gold output surged 41.1%! Just 17.5% of its Q1 revenues came from silver, making it overwhelmingly a primary gold miner. Its newest mine ramping up is another sizable gold one.

SIL’s second-largest component is Wheaton Precious Metals. It used to be a pure silver-streaming play known as Silver Wheaton. Silver streamers make big upfront payments to miners to pre-purchase some of their future silver production at far-below-market unit prices. This is beneficial to miners because they use the large initial capital infusions to help finance mine builds, which banks often charge usurious rates for.



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June 10 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

China Faces Showdown in Hong Kong as Mass Protests Roar Back

This article by Shawna Kwan, Carol Zhong and Blake Schmidt for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

China has spent much of the past five years tightening its gripover Hong Kong with little challenge. Now, hundreds of thousands in the city are fighting back.

Hong Kong is bracing for a potentially historic showdown over extradition legislation that could for the first time subject residents to face justice in Chinese courts, further eroding the city’s autonomy. Opponents on Sunday staged one of the largest protests since the former British colony’s return to China: Organizers said more than 1 million participants showed up, while police put the figure at 240,000.

Tensions are only heating up, with demonstrators vowing to surround the city’s Legislative Council on Wednesday, when lawmakers debate scores of proposed amendments. Hong Kong’s Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, defended the bill in a 45-minute news briefing Monday, saying it was necessary to prevent the city from becoming a “haven” for fugitives and vowing to press ahead with its passage. China endorsed her government’s efforts later in the day.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Deng promised the “one country, two systems” model would last for a century. Hong Kong will be lucky if it makes it to quarter of that time. Extra judicial disappearances have been a feature of Hong Kong life for the last decade and this extradition law would institutionalise the process. Tightening mainland oversight, particularly of critics of the administration is inevitable regardless of how many people protest. In the meantime, there is a clear intent to express power and control over Chinese territories so this situation has the potential to escalate.



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June 07 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 07 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Bets on July Fed Rate Cut Gain Momentum After U.S. Jobs Report

This article by Susanne Barton, Katherine Greifeld and Liz Capo McCormick for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

Bond traders’ conviction that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates within months in response to a weakening growth outlook and escalating trade tensions firmed after a batch of weaker-than-expected U.S. jobs data.

Fed funds futures show a quarter-point cut almost fully priced in for July, and indicate about 70 basis points of easing by the end of 2019. The two-year Treasury yield fell as much as 11 basis points to 1.77%, close to the 2019 low reached Wednesday, and it was on course for its fifth weekly decline.

The last time that happened was back in July 2016, when the U.S. central bank’s target range was 2 percentage points lower than right now.

Eoin Treacy's view -

Lead indicators for future problems are flashing orange. If the Fed were to persist in its policy of continuing to raise rates and reducing the size of the balance sheet it would contribute to recession risk. If it steps on the monetary accelerator once more it risks further inflating a bubble, not least in the nonbank lending and private equity sectors.



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June 07 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 07 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Shell's Floating Prelude LNG Poised to Load First Cargo

This article by Stephen Stapczynski for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here it is full:

Shell’s Prelude floating LNG plant offshore Australia is expected to load its first cargo on the vessel Valencia Knutsen, which is currently idled in the area, according to commodity shipment tracker Kpler.

* The vessel arrived near Prelude on June 4 and was likely attempting to load from the facility, but it left berth range a few hours after arrival, Kpler analysts said

** The vessel will probably be moored alongside the Prelude facility before the end of the week: Kpler

* NOTE: Shipment of the first LNG cargo is “imminent,” Platts reported on June 4, citing Shell’s head of integrated gas, Maarten Wetselaar

Eoin Treacy's view -

When Royal Dutch Shell announced it was ready to spend billions on developing a major offshore LNG processing facility in Northern Australia a few years ago it was considered a risky venture. However, the company’s long-term bet on natural gas representing a much better demand growth trajectory than crude oil has been proved correct. 



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June 07 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Beyond Meat's Forecast Wows Wall Street as IPO Darling Delivers

This article by Janet Freund for Bloomberg may be of interest to subscribers. Here is a section:

“As long as Street forecasts fail to properly reflect BYND’s remarkable potential, we remain overweight.” Notes that “eventually this stock’s hefty valuation will more than offset the fast-growing fundamentals.”

Notes the importance of CEO Ethan Brown calling the forecast “very conservative” and telling investors that the company doesn’t include foodservice customers in guidance until they are past the testing stage.

JPMorgan has a $233 million 2019 sales target -- vs the company forecast of $210 million -- and the analyst says his estimate may be conservative. “It is conceivable that Tim Hortons alone (a current customer with nearly 5,000 locations that is not yet in guidance) could account for most of that
gap.” Rates overweight, price target to $120 from $97

Eoin Treacy's view -

Meat alternative providers like Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger have a clear benefit in that they are providing a new product which is fashionable. The trendiness of vegan food products that are considered both healthy and taste good represents a significant market phenomenon which has been growing in importance at local eateries around Los Angeles for the last couple of years. The primary benefit of these products for fast food chains like McDonalds, Burger King or Jack in the Box is they attract a new demographic that normally avoid such establishments.



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June 06 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

June 06 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Email of the day on ETF holdings of gold

I have been particularly taking note of the chart for The Total Known ETF holdings of gold over the past two weeks and observe it has bounced emphatically off the trend mean. Does this reinforce your view that gold is due for a bullish outlook?

Eoin Treacy's view -

ETF Holdings of Gold represent a significant source of demand for gold as an investible asset class. At 71.4 million ounces ETFs represent larger stockpiles than most countries and therefore reflect a signal as to the interest of the international community in the gold market.



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June 06 2019

Commentary by Eoin Treacy

Is silver due to catch up?

Thanks to a subscriber for this report from UBS which may be of interest. Here is a section:

Eoin Treacy's view -

A link to the full report is posted in the Subscriber's Area. 

The Gold/Silver ratio is at rather extreme but not the most extreme levels seen historically. David long described silver as high-beta gold and poor man’s gold. The less liquid nature of silver trading and the various use cases for the metal contribute to it being more volatile than gold.



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